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Uncertain about Pregnancy?

We offer Pills abortion or RU486 pills up to 7 weeks of pregnancy and regular abortion for free. We offer the presumptive eligibility program also known as PE. With PE you can receive services for miscarriage or abortion immediately and for free. Any California resident who believes that they are pregnant and whose family income is at or below 200% of the federal poverty level is eligible for this program. Call now to see if you qualify.

EWC recipients must have a household income at or below 200 percent of the federal Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines. The HHS poverty guidelines are adjusted annually. “Gross household income” means the monthly sum of incomes (before taxes and other deductions) of the individual(s) living in the household.

EWC INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES
200 Percent of the 2015 HHS Poverty Guidelines by Household Size
Effective April 1, 2015, through March 31, 2016

Number of Persons
Living in Household
Monthly Gross
Household Income
Annual Gross
Household Income
1 $1,962 $23,540
2 $2,655 $31,860
3 $3,349 $40,180
4 $4,042 $48,500
5 $4,735 $56,820
6 $5,429 $65,140
7 $6,122 $73,460
8 $6,815 $81,780
For each additional
person, add:
$694 $8,320

 

Women often have mixed feelings when they are faced with an unplanned pregnancy. Any decision that is made—whether it is keeping the baby, having an abortion, or planning an adoption will be hard and mean changes in your life.

If you are involved with the baby’s father, it may be helpful to talk with him about your feelings regarding your options. He may also have strong feelings about the pregnancy.

You will actually be making two decisions if it is early in the pregnancy:

Do I want to continue the pregnancy? and Do I want to parent a child?

Ask Yourself These Questions
•    Am I able to give a child what it needs—emotionally and financially?
•    Will I have to count on my parents or family for help? Are they willing and able to do so? Will they pressure me to do what they want?
•    Can I raise a child and meet my own needs? To finish school? Support myself? Start a career?
•    Am I ready to become a parent on my own? Will the babys father be there for me now or in the future?
•    What kind of help can my husband/baby’s father give me? Financial? Emotional? Will he help care for the baby?
•    Am I too young or too old to have the responsibility of the baby?
•    Do I have problems, like drinking or drugs, that will keep me from being a good parent?
•    Will my religious or cultural beliefs influence what choice I make?
Choices
You are pregnant and unsure what you want to do. If you it is still early in the pregnancy, you have three choices: keeping the baby, having an abortion, or planning an adoption. It is important to talk with a counselor about your choice.
Keeping the baby is:

•    Accepting at least 18 years of responsibility for a child

•    Giving up your freedom in order to meet a child’s needs

•    Changing your social life, your sleep patterns, and your daily schedule

•    Having patience and love to deal with the 24-hour-a-day needs of the baby

•    Adapting both your education and career goals with the baby in mind

Abortion Is:
•    Ending the pregnancy
•    Having a simple surgical procedure done early in the pregnancy or taking pills.
•    Going through both physical and emotional changes after the procedure
•    A decision that you may feel both relieved and sad about
Adoption Is:
•    A loving but difficult choice that means giving birth without parenting
•    Choosing between two types of adoption
Open Adoption means
•    Choosing the family, meeting them, and maybe spending time~ with them
•    Perhaps having the family help you with medical care and other needs
•    Continuing contact with them after the baby is born if you desire

Closed/Private Adoption means
•    Not meeting the family who adopts your baby
•    Not having ongoing contact with them
•    Perhaps having the family help you with medical care and other needs